Serve Well Blog

Entries tagged 'Sustaining Service'

6.8.12

2012 Keynote Video: Krista Foundation Conference

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Developing Nations, Environmental Projects, Urban America, Community, Education, Environment, Faith/Theological Exploration, Global Citizenship, Sustaining Service


conference logoThis Keynote Address: Roots of Hope, was given Saturday, May 26th, 2012, at The Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship's Annual Conference.

Dr. Cynthia Moe-Lobeda is Associate Professor of Theological and Social Ethics for Seattle University's Department of Theology and Religious Studies, Environmental Studies Program, and School of Theology and Ministry. Her current book project concerns faith-based response to systemic evils such as racism, economic exploitation, and ecological devastation.

The Krista Foundation 2012 Conference theme was Growing Service Leadership: Rooted for Life. Over the weekend, young adults in our program and intergenerational mentors spent time learning together how to develop and maintain healthy roots amidst the challenges of service and transition.

4.27.12

5.20.12 is the KF Annual Day of Prayer

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Developing Nations, Environmental Projects, Urban America, Community, Faith/Theological Exploration, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life, Sustaining Service

Day of Prayer | 5.20

Kara with kids in BoliviaEach year, the KF marks May 20th as a special day of prayer for the life of The Krista Foundation extended community. We pause to remember the young adults accompanying people around the world in mutual service and learning. Krista Colleagues serving around the globe send in celebrations and prayer requests.

In Spokane: Join a gathering from 3-5PM at the Hearth for afternoon tea in the garden.
(9115 N. Mtn. View Lane, Spokane, 99218)
Elsewhere in the world: Join in prayer at 12 noon where you are.

To request the full Prayer Guide in PDF, please email jonathan@kristafoundation.org (we will email it to you on the 18th).

4.20.12

Service Leadership Update- A Voice for Justice

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Urban America, Arts & Culture, Community, Education, Faith/Theological Exploration, Poverty: Urban US & International, Sustaining Service

nikkita oliver, photo by Contina Kemp"Justice, like people, has living impact" writes Nikkita Oliver ('08), who currently teaches poetry, debate and biblical leadership, and runs the chapel program at the Seattle Urban Academy (SUA). Serving for two years as a chaplain and service provider at the King County Youth Detention Center, Nikkita accompanied youth struggling in the system, and listened to their stories. "...The law should work to the benefit of the people,"writes Nikkita, "In my experience, I have not seen the law work as such." These troubling encounters have strengthened her resolve to bring legal literacy and empowerment to her south Seattle community.

 

Colleagues Nikkita Oliver '08 and Laura Wright '11She has a track record of developing community youth. An active musician and spoken word artist, Nikkita facilitates community spaces for youth to give voice to their world. A member of the 2011 KF Conference planning team, also she used her artistic gifts to lead the worship service. This month, Nikkita received the exciting news that she earned a full scholarship to attend the University of Washington Law School. The KF community celebrates Nikkita as she takes the next step on her journey of service leadership.

3.15.12

Thank You - The Ripple Effect

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Community, Sustaining Service

2012 GCA Honorees Joe, Trise, and Sharon

Thank you for expanding The Ripple Effect!

More than 375 enthusiastic guests filled Campion Ballroom to celebrate the power of service leadership to change our world. The Krista Foundation honored three exemplary service leaders making a ripple effect. 

The 2012 Global Citizen Award honorees included Sharon London of EarthCorps (Environment), Trise Moore in parent involvement (Urban United States), and Joe Whinney of Theo Chocolate (the Developing World). The three recipients were honored with a beautiful handmade award and a video crafted and narrated by Krista Colleagues.

Colleague Speaker Chris BhangKrista Colleagues Amy McNair and Chris Bhang illuminated the ripple effects that service volunteer experiences continue making in their lives, and how the Krista Foundation mentoring community helps them transform those experiences into lives of service leadership in law and education.

Leading up to the event, 75 Krista Colleagues (including 32 Colleagues in attendance) had contributed more than $9,000 in gifts and pledges as challenge to guests to contribute. We're thrilled that nearly 75% of guests were brand new to the Foundation's vision: empowering young adults to transform service experiences into lives of service leadership. Their tremendous generosity raised $30,000 to further the Krista Foundation's mission.

Ripple Effect GuestsTake this opportunity to make your own contribution to The Ripple Effect. Click Here.

Last but not least, thanks to our sponsors Seattle University Mission and Ministry and Sozo Wines... and thanks to YOU!!

What resonates for you about The Ripple Effect of service and service leadership?

Please share a comment below.

 



 

 Ripple Sponsor - SU Mission and MinistryRipple sponsor - Sozo Wines

3.13.12

2012 Colleague Nominations Due March 20th

The Krista Foundation | Krista Foundation Press, Developing Nations, Environmental Projects, Urban America, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life, Preparing To Serve, Sustaining Service, Transitions Home & Beyond

Joe and Glen form the KFDue March 20th

Dear Krista Colleague Nominators and Foundation friends!

DO YOU KNOW A GRADUATING SENIOR OR ALUM BEGINNING OR CURRENTLY ENGAGED IN SIGNIFICANT VOLUNTEER SERVICE?

Please nominate young adults heading out or currently engaged in long-term volunteer or vocational service to become a 2012 Krista Colleague, including a $1,000 Service and Leadership Development Grant.

Nominations are due March 20th. Click here for Nomination criteriaOnline Nomination formDownloadable form in Doc or PDF.

  • Every year, we welcome a new cohort of "Krista Colleagues". Each joins a multi-year ecumenical Christian mentoring community and receives a $1,000 Service and Leadership Development Grant.
  • New Krista Colleagues engage in supplemental training as they begin extended volunteer or vocational service with the service organization of their choice (examples include PeaceCorps, Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Presbyterian Young Adult Volunteers, AmeriCorps, etc.)
  • After concluding their assignment, Krista Colleagues participate in a debriefing retreat, and engage in ongoing peer-mentoring and leadership development through the Foundation.

Please complete online nominations, or download the Doc or PDF and email to our office.

Questions?
Call 206-382-7888 or email our office if you have questions regarding a candidate's eligibility (acceptable income range for vocational or volunteer pay, duration of service, Pacific Northwest ties, etc.)

Please click the "share" button below and forward this to community members who may know potential nominees.

"Transforming service experiences into lives of service leadership."

Related Documents

Acrobat (PDF) Document

2012 Colleague Cohort nomination ad
Download (743Kb, pdf)

2.12.12

Trise Moore | Krista Foundation GCA- Urban United States

Destiny Williams, The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Krista Foundation Press, Urban America, Community, Education, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life, Poverty: Urban US & International, Sustaining Service

Trise Moore Krista Foundation GCA Urban U.S.The Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship announces the selection of Trise Moore to be honored with a Global Citizen Award for embodying a life of service leadership in the area of Urban United States.

Moore leads the increasingly diverse Federal Way School District's community partnership initiatives to improve student achievement. Implementing innovative strengths-based approaches, Moore navigates intercultural and adaptive challenges, dismantling barriers and empowering parents to become effective partners in student academic success. Moore, who became Family and Community Partnership Advocate for the Federal Way School District in 2003, previously received national honors as chair of the City of Federal Way's Diversity Commission.

"The Krista Foundation is delighted to honor Trise Moore for her service-centered leadership in the diverse urban context of Federal Way," says Krista Foundation Executive Director Valerie Norwood. "Service that transforms communities is not a one-way path of giver to receiver. It must be mutually transformative. Trise leverages the insights of parents and other key stakeholders, together creating a model of family engagement that is gaining national recognition and making a positive ripple effect in Federal Way and beyond."

Moore is one of three mid-career professionals from the Puget Sound region to be honored by the Krista Foundation for exemplifying the qualities of Global Citizenship: service leadership that creates community and sustainable futures for people and the environment.

The 2012 Krista Foundation Global Citizen Award recipients will be formally announced and honored at a public event on Sunday, March 4th, 7:00 pm in the Campion Ballroom at Seattle University. The three honorees demonstrate the event theme: "The Ripple Effect: Service changes you. Service changes the world." Tickets for the event are available by contacting The Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship at 206-382-7888 or nissana@kristafoundation.org. This is an RSVP-only event.

Global Citizen Award recipients are selected for demonstrating the Krista Foundation values: intercultural competence, adaptive leadership, young adult empowerment, respect for spiritual values, global-local connection, and service as a way of life. The other 2012 Global Citizen Award recipients to be honored are:
Sharon London, Strategic Initiatives Director, EarthCorps (Environment)
Joseph Whinney, Founder & CEO, Theo Chocolate (Developing World)

About the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship: Founded in 1999, The Krista Foundation honors the life and vision of Krista Hunt Ausland who died at age 25 while volunteering with her husband in rural Bolivia. Through mentoring, a colleague community and re-integration services, the Krista Foundation helps young adults fully understand and employ the learnings from their service experience. A service year, when nurtured, becomes a life of service leadership. The Krista Foundation provides ongoing program connections for more than 200 Krista Colleagues and offers program development resources and services, including The Global Citizen journal, for local universities and volunteer service organizations.

Link to KF Ripple Effect Event Page

Link to KF Ripple Effect Facebook Page

Krista Colleague endorsement for Trise Moore by Carmetrus Parker

As a former AmeriCorps volunteer and Krista Colleague, I am so happy to see that Trise Moore is being honored with the Krista Foundation's 2012 Global Citizen Award in the area of Urban United States. I value the tremendous work Trise Moore is doing in Federal Way as a Family Partnership Advocate and I applaud Federal Way School District for taking steps in engaging parents.

As an AmeriCorps volunteer in the urban setting of Tacoma's Hilltop neighborhood, I provided in class assistance to students and coordinated an after school program focused on literacy development in early readers. The after school program was housed at Trinity Presbyterian Church and the primary focus was of the program was on students reading below grade level. It became apparent to me that my students needed more than just an after school reading program and I soon found myself in the uncomfortable position of being an advocate.

I did not understand what being an education advocate meant. I was confronted by frustrated parents that truly wanted the best for their child. Some parents felt they were not getting their concern heard, let alone addressed. Others didn't see school as a safe place and turned to the "girl at the church" as a confidante. Many more respected the program and viewed the church as a place of integrity. Whatever the reason, parents came to me. I soon began having conversations with teachers and principals that ended in uncomfortable eye and leg shifting.

I began to ask hard questions. It seemed the more questions I asked, the fewer answers I received. I began to research and seek answers independently. I discovered resources that I never knew existed! As a parent, I soon realized how ill equipped I had been to advocate for my own children. I was not only ill equipped, but ill informed. I began sharing information on student and parent rights and responsibilities. I requested information and brochures from the Education Ombudsman. I referred parents to advocacy trainings and encouraged them to contact their assigned school director when a situation could not be resolved at the school level.

In AmeriCorps, my primary function was to serve when and where I was needed most. I never imagined that I would become an advocate for families, yet I am proud and honored for being called into this role. I recognize that there was a deficit within the system and a need that was not being fulfilled.

It is obvious that Trise Moore has a heart for families and a true desire to serve her community through her role as Family and Community Partnership Advocate. Her vision for family engagement resonated with me because it shifts from blaming parents to empowering them. I have often felt that I was not a partner in my children's education. Trise Moore is committed to ensuring that all parents have an opportunity to KC Carmetrus Parkerparticipate and, ultimately, become partners in educating their children. In a society focused on individual achievement it is refreshing to see a collective approach to ensuring success for all. Focusing on family engagement in our schools is an approach that is often not a priority in public education. The benefits are countless, as issues of the ever-widening achievement gap can be more readily addressed, and increased parental involvement is an invaluable resource to students and teachers alike.

Hats off to Trise Moore and her colleagues in Federal Way for prioritizing and focusing on family engagement, and recognizing the ripple effect it has on student achievement.

Carmetrus Parker is a 2009 Krista Colleague, Program Coordinator at Tacoma Urban League, and Director of Community Relations and TAP at Trinity Presbyterian Church.

2.12.12

Joseph Whinney | 2012 Krista Foundation GCA Honoree- Developing World

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Krista Foundation Press, Developing Nations, Business, Community, Environment, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life, Sustaining Service

Joe WhinneyThe Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship announced the selection of Joseph Whinney to be honored with a Global Citizen Award for embodying a life of service leadership in the Developing World.

Joseph Whinney, Founder and CEO of Theo Chocolate, is a leader in fair trade business. As young adult conservation volunteer, Whinney recognized opportunities to improve the environmental and economic livelihood of farmers in the cacao industry. Through Whinney's service leadership, Theo Chocolate is making a ripple effect: improving conditions for farmers, educating chocolate consumers, and gaining recognition as leading model of conscious capitalism.

"A global citizen recognizes, nurtures and strengthens constructive relationships between local communities and their global impact," says Krista Foundation Executive Director Valerie Norwood. "Joseph Whinney not only understands the global-local interconnection, he lives out an ethic of mutuality through Theo Chocolate. He is inspired both by farmers seeking education and basic quality of life, and also by Theo customers. Together they create a movement of healthy stewardship globally and locally. For the young adult service volunteers across the world connected to Krista Foundation programs, Whinney's example shows how business offers creative and effective tools to transform social and environmental challenges."

Whinney is one of three mid-career professionals from the Puget Sound region to be honored by the Krista Foundation for exemplifying the qualities of Global Citizenship; service leadership that creates community and sustainable futures for people and the environment.

The 2012 Krista Foundation Global Citizen Award recipients will be formally announced and honored at a public event on Sunday, March 4th, 7:00 pm in the Campion Ballroom at Seattle University. The three honorees demonstrate the event theme: "The Ripple Effect: Service changes you. Service changes the world." Tickets for the event are available by contacting The Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship at 206-382-7888 or nissana@kristafoundation.org. This is an RSVP-Only event.

Global Citizen Award recipients are selected for demonstrating the Krista Foundation values: intercultural competence, adaptive leadership, young adult empowerment, respect for spiritual values, global-local connection, and service as a way of life. The other 2012 Global Citizen Award recipients to be honored are:

Sharon London, Strategic Initiatives Director, EarthCorps (Environment)
Trise Moore, Family and Community Partnership Advocate, Federal Way School District (Urban United States)

About the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship: Founded in 1999, The Krista Foundation honors the life and vision of Krista Hunt Ausland who died at age 25 while volunteering with her husband in rural Bolivia. Through mentoring, a colleague community and re-integration services, the Krista Foundation helps young adults fully understand and employ the learnings from their service experience. A service year, when nurtured, becomes a life of service leadership. The Krista Foundation provides ongoing program connections for more than 200 Krista Colleagues and offers program development resources and services, including The Global Citizen journal, for local universities and volunteer service organizations.

Link to KF Ripple Effect Event Page

Link to KF Ripple Effect Facebook Page

Krista Colleague endorsement for Joe Whinney by Joe Tobiason

As a Krista Colleague, and a former international service volunteer, I'm so impressed with what Joe Whinney is doing with Theo Chocolate. I'm also excited he was recently selected by the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship to receive a 2012 Global Citizen Award in the area of Developing World.

Theo, located in Seattle's Fremont neighborhood, is making a ripple effect in so many important ways. Theo is the first and only organic fair trade chocolate maker in the United States. The words "fair trade" get tossed around a lot, but I learned through my volunteer experience in Lima, Peru, that those words have the power to break the cycle of poverty and change lives.

Women from Cooperative, Jodi 2nd from right, J Tobiason PhotographyWorking alongside women in the Bridge of Hope Fair Trade Organization opened my eyes to how good trade practices can lift entire communities out of abject poverty and into a life that is healthier and safer. Over my year of service I built deep connections with an artisan community called El Mercurio in the town of Huancavelica. The group was begun by a woman named Jodi (pictured second from right- J Tobiason Photography). During my visit, I had the privilege of translating her story for a group of international visitors.

She shared that she was just a normal housewife who needed to find a way to make some extra money. She had some friends who had heard about this fair trade. They got in contact with the Red Uniendo Manos and their Fair Trade branch. With access to export tools, they started their group, named after the chemical that continued to contaminate their town. They began to produce small stuffed animals and their most well-known llamas. To hear Jodi talk about how this fair trade organization had changed her life showed me the incredible value of tools for poverty relief. Not only did this give her family some extra money so that her kids could go to school, but it changed the way her house worked. Her husband was no longer the only money-maker and thus he had to shift the way he looked at her. The family became more equitable and she had never felt so respected. Her transformation is something that can only be truly understood by looking at the smile on her face every time she talked about Fair Trade.

Joe Whinney, Theo Chocolate, and the chocolate loving community are making a real impact. Consider the connections that his company has built with its growers. They use the Fair Trade principles because this is the middle way for commerce that honors the value in all parts of the process. The fair trade community Joe Tobiason, Krista Colleagueseeks to provide wages that are equitable and fair for workers on the ground, while still providing the highest quality possible. Theo really exemplifies this as it is known throughout the Northwest for producing some of the best chocolates. But the fair trade principles don't end when the cacao beans are in shipment: Joe has ensured that it continues all the way through Theo employees. The company is known for helping its own people to grow in their skills and truly thrive in the community. Theo exemplifies how trade can benefit the growers, the sellers and the buyers and has made Fair Trade principles a reality in Seattle.

Just take their tour and you'll be buzzing about Theo too. Then come and celebrate Joe Whinney and Theo Chocolate when he receives the 2012 Global Citizen Award on March 4th at Seattle University. Learn more at: http://www.kristafoundation.org/index.cfm/page/therippleeffect.

Joe Tobiason is a 2008 Krista Colleague. He currently resides in Greenlake and works at Big Fish Games in Seattle. He has a serious passion for photography. (@JTobiasonPhoto on Twitter or J Tobiason Photography on Facebook)

 

8.12.11

Poor Timing to Cut Funding for AmeriCorps/Volunteerism

Destiny Williams | Service In The News, Urban America, Integrating Service As A Way Of Life, Preparing To Serve, Sustaining Service

Jenny Yu, AmeriCorps, TacomaAaron Ausland recently noted the surprising inverse relationship between unemployment and volunteering-that as unemployment rises, volunteerism rates go down. He stated that the number of volunteers in America dropped by 600,000 from last year, bringing the national volunteering rate down by a half a percentage point, to 26.3%. While it could seem logical to assume unemployed people have more spare time and would more likely fill that time with volunteering, the opposite appears true.

Overall, we were surprised to see the downward overall trend in volunteering (broadly defined). It makes me ask: which primary demographic is volunteering less? In our work with year long service volunteer programs, millenials seem to be bucking this trend. We're still hearing from service organizations that record numbers of young adults are applying to serve (JVC-Northwest, for example, had a 50% increase in applicants).

Unfortunately, Congress recently took the wind out of these sails, which threatens the quantity and quality of service volunteerism. Congress made drastic cuts to AmeriCorps ($22.5 million in cuts to AmeriCorps Education Awards). Catholic Volunteer Network, which has 1300 AmeriCorps- funded volunteers at 900 sites, is facing a $5 million gap from the cuts. See article on CVN. In spite of debt and budget challenges, prioritizing funding for young adult service volunteerism has critical economic and social implications.

In a report on unemployment I heard on NPR last week, young adults 25 and under have an unemployment rate near 17%. Reihan Salam, a policy advisor at e21 (an economics think-tank) was saying how much this statistic particularly hurts the economy in the long run. Getting a good job early, to build skills and move up into better paying jobs, ultimately builds a stronger economy and leads to more revenue into the tax system. Instead, many young adults are being stalled out of the starting gate, or starting in the "loser's bracket," and our economy will never fully catch up. Cutting AmeriCorps funding kicks this younger generation when it's already down, when it should be offering an essential way to build marketable skills while promoting civic engagement and fostering commitment to the common good-not to mention meeting real needs in our struggling communities.

Under-funding AmeriCorps is one sure way to speed the decline of current volunteering and depress future numbers. Squeezing service volunteer organizations threatens not only the quantity of volunteers, but also the ability of organizations to provide quality service volunteer care (including proper training and debriefing).

At a 50th anniversary event for the Peace Corps, I heard National Director Aaron S. Williams say that, more than ANY other program we have, Peace Corps volunteers (and I would say AmeriCorps volunteers too) represent our highest ideals and values as a nation.

We are in a challenging economic climate that disproportionately affects opportunities for young adults. Whether motivated by economics, idealism, or common sense, shouldn't we be investing in young adult service programs, rather than cutting them?

6.24.11

Walking Alongside in Sitka

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Urban America, Poverty: Urban US & International, Sustaining Service

Liz Purdy carves totem in SitkaLiz Purdy’s enthusiastic heart for service has taken the Seattle native to the far corners of the nation. In 2010, she spent five months teaching English to refugees at Jubilee Partners, an intentional Christian service community in Comer, Georgia. Last Fall, she moved from the southeastern United States to the southeast of Alaska to work in the town of Sitka. As a participant in the Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest, Liz is a women’s advocate at Sitkans Against Family Violence (SAFV) working alongside survivors of domestic violence. At SAFV, Liz assists with housing applications, connects women with pro-bono legal work and public assistance, prepares protective orders and accompanies women to court if so desired. “We are women willing to help other women navigate an often challenging legal and social service system that is rarely ‘user friendly,’” Liz said. She appreciates the philosophy of SAFV, saying, "We never tell a woman what we think she should do, but we let her know what her options are, offer objective feedback, and inform her as best we can about the tools she has at her disposal.”

This year, Liz has come face to face with the complexity of helping women in a cycle of abuse, and she has learned accompaniment in the process. “It’s hard to have women come in and ask for help, just to go back to dangerous situations or to feed their addictions. They may come back the next day, the next week, or never,” Liz said. This harsh reality reinforced for Liz that not only is she not called to fix anyone’s problems, but also that she couldn’t if she wanted to. Rather, her role is to listen and to support these women who struggle to make sense of their situation and try to move forward. Some days the positive change is hard to see.

At times, Liz misses the more measurable progress of teaching English back at Jubilee, and she often wonders where she'll find herself when her JVC-Northwest term is over. A concept Liz heard from former KF Keynote Father Greg Boyle has particularly resonated with her throughout this time: “We’re not called to be successful, we’re called to be faithful.” Focusing on the present, Liz is better able to walk alongside women struggling with feelings of hopelessness, helping them take the small steps toward healing and hope. 

Be sure to check out Liz's blog at www.lizpurdy.wordpress.com.
Special thanks to Annie Mesaros (09') for contributing this piece.

4.6.11

Future Physician Learns Healthcare Challenges

The Krista Foundation | Colleague Press, Urban America, Healthcare, Poverty: Urban US & International, Sustaining Service

Mike advocates for AmeriCorps"When most people discharge from a hospital stay, a family member takes them to a warm home where they can rest and be fed," Says new Colleague Mike Alston, who serves with JVC - Northwest in Portland, Oregon. "Homeless patients head out the front door with only a bus ticket." Though deemed "medically stable" Mike has noticed people leave tired, sore, and stressed. Through the innovative Recuperation Care Program, Mike helps homeless clients transition from the hospital to housing and recovery, beginning by driving them to a building with food and a warm bed.

Though Mike majored in International Economic Development, he's become discouraged about economic disparity closer to home. "There simply aren't enough slots for those who genuinely want help. The whole city is strapped. It makes it hard when someone wants to move forward and make good choices, but the best they can do is be on a waiting list." Still, he tries to hold on to the success stories: "It is great when clients defy your negative expectations. One woman came to us cycling through the emergency room, in a wheelchair, and her life was falling apart. Still, she discharged into permanent housing, and has been walking and sober for months-and keeping regular appointments! It's hard not to become jaded, but sometimes clients defy your expectations in a positive way."

Set to begin Medical School at the University of Washington this fall, Mike is gaining valuable insight into a medically vulnerable population and the medical care system through his service at the hospital. He plans to use his Krista Foundation Grant funds to attend the Northwest Regional Primary Care Association's Spring Conference "to better prepare for... a career (as a physician) and to better understand the various issues surrounding healthcare delivery to poor and vulnerable populations." Mike also plans to bring lessons from the conference back to Old Town Clinic in Portland.

As a volunteer in the presidential motorcade, Mike was recently able to meet President Obama. Mike took the opportunity to remind the President that AmeriCorps funding was critical to his work, but that the House had passed a budget with significant cuts to the program. The President affirmed his concern, and thanked him for his service.